November 12, 2019

Ignite CBD: Our Review

Dan Bilzerian’s CBD Drops are the stuff FDA nightmares are made of

Ignite CBD Review

Overview of Ignite: Calm CBD Oil

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Dan Bilzerian is a man who initially made his fortune playing poker, but today he is most famous for his magnate bachelor lifestyle and getting himself into trouble with his inflammatory acts of machismo.

So, it feels ironic that Bilzerian struck his own claim within the green rush to create Ignite, a cannabis brand that features a line of products that claims to reduce inflammation. Like Bilzerian’s personal Instagram, Ignite’s account feels like an archive of b-roll footage for Fyre Fest promotional videos.

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The second photo on Ignite’s account at the time of writing features four models in an exotic, tropical location. One of the models is rubbing the lavender CBD Drops I’m supposed to be reviewing on another model’s butt cheek, with the caption, “Look, you can even rub this shit on sunburns.”

Considering I’m currently laying on my couch surrounded by Kleenex and cold medicine, the image doesn’t do much for me. Plus, what’s the point if I have to rub the product on my own butt, assuming that it doesn’t come with my very own sexy model?

I’m warned by the label on the bottle that I should consult a physician before using the drops if I’m lactating, pregnant, or have a serious illness. It doesn’t exactly make the product titillating. (Pun intended, of course.) Neither does the Prop 65 warning, indicating that the product may include chemicals known in the state of California to be carcinogenic.

So, what are Ignite’s CBD drops exactly? CBD oil? Essential oil? Snake oil?

It depends on whether you’re looking at the packaging, the bottle, or the website. Fractionated coconut oil (MCT), and CBD hemp extract are the only consistencies (although the order they’re listed in is not). On the actual bottle, ‘natural flavors’ and ‘stevia’ suddenly appear out of nowhere. On the website ‘natural flavors’ mysteriously disappears and ‘essential oils’ seems to take its place. FDA, take the wheel.

To be fair, if Ignite’s CBD ‘drops’ have as much CBD as they claim to (keeping in mind a study that showed 70 percent of CBD products are mislabeled) they’re very reasonably priced, coming in at about 6 cents per milligram of CBD (10 cents or under is considered reasonable).

How about the actual product?

First, I tasted it. I had to see if it was flavored with the intention of being ingested, despite the only instructions being to use it topically. I did this while making direct eye contact with the Prop 65 warning on the packaging. Lo and behold, the drops are sweetened, seemingly with the intention of being ingested, which the company doesn’t tell you to do, but it also doesn’t necessarily tell you not to do. The plot thickens.

The label says to put it on areas with inflammation, so I “rub that shit” on my tendonitis. Over the next few hours, nothing happens, although a friend remarks on my lavender scented forearms.

In terms of novelty, it’s definitely a plus if you like the smell of lavender. I’m a bit surprised that the hordes of alpha males following Bilzerian are okay with CBD oil that has a floral scent. Perhaps Bilzerian is paving the way for florists to reach a wider market.

Ultimately, do I recommend paying $54.99 for CBD ‘drops’ from a company owned by a man whose sordid history drips toxic masculinity; a product whose ingredients change depending on where they’re listed; a product that isn’t clear about whether you’re supposed to be ingesting it or using it topically?

I’ll just say this: The aforementioned Instagram caption described it best.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this article are just that, opinions.

Information found in this article or on fredandjane.com shouldn’t be taken as any medical or scientific opinion, advice or recommendation. Please do your own research and consult with your doctor before introducing cannabinoids to your body.

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